• By Louise Jones

    Photography by Hubert Schriebl

    A married couple, both novelists, works in the home they share. How do they manage? Very well, according to Wendy and Jon Clinch of Ludlow. He is the author of the highly praised Finn and Kings of the Earth. She has written two well-received “Ski Diva” mysteries—Double Black and Fade to White—and runs the Ski […]

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    Writing Together

    Wendy and Jon Clinch 245x300 Writing Together

    Wendy and Jon Clinch

    A married couple, both novelists, works in the home they share. How do they manage? Very well, according to Wendy and Jon Clinch of Ludlow. He is the author of the highly praised Finn and Kings of the Earth. She has written two well-received “Ski Diva” mysteries—Double Black and Fade to White—and runs the Ski Diva website for women skiers. Before devoting their time to writing fiction, they owned an advertising agency in suburban Philadelphia for 19 years, so working together comes naturally. “On a given day one of us would be in the office and the other out meeting clients, so we were able to work well in the same space,” Jon explains. “Today, when we both write, it’s the same.”

    Jon Clinch taught high school English for three years before he went into advertising. He and Wendy were working for different agencies when they met, then formed their own business when they married in 1976. They were originally part time Vermonters, renting a condo as a weekend ski retreat Sundays through Wednesdays, and returning to the ad agency the rest of the week. Then they purchased a home in Vermont in 2004. Three years later Jon published his first novel, Finn, which received excellent reviews; that encouraged them to take the leap and move to Vermont full time.

    Finn is a wonderfully imagined novel that recreates Pap Finn, Huckleberry Finn’s cruel and vicious father; he appears briefly in Mark Twain’s classic, the personification of malevolence. 

    Finn is a wonderfully imagined novel that recreates Pap Finn, Huckleberry Finn’s cruel and vicious father; he appears briefly in Mark Twain’s classic, the personification of malevolence. Clinch examines the nature of evil through this brutal man; a few scenes recreate incidents in Twain’s book, but the vast majority of Jon Clinch’s work is fresh, with fully realized characters; it delves into Pap’s miserable life, evoking a long-ago time and society, including violent and tragic people like Pap. Jon describes The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as a “frontier novel”.

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